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Bill Gates to Give $100 Million to Fund Alzheimer’s Research

Bill Gates to Give 100 Million to Fund Alzheimers Research
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Bill Gates, the co-founder of Microsoft, is ready for his next project: joining the fight against Alzheimer’s disease.

He also announced on Monday that will contribute about $50 million into the Dementia Discovery Fund, which will help to create new tactics to fight dementia. This came after he invested in start-ups working on Alzheimer’s research for an additional $50 million.

“It’s a miracle that people are living so much longer, but longer life expectancies alone are not enough,” Gates mentioned. “People should be able to enjoy their later years and we need a breakthrough in Alzheimer’s to fulfill that.”

Bill Gates explained that he has a family history of Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia. He is also concerned that the condition threatens the overall U.S. health care system.

There is still no cure for the disease even after spending billions of dollars on research nor is there enough to answer basic questions about how and why it develops.

“This is something I know a lot about, because men in my family have suffered from Alzheimer’s,” Gates said.

“I know how awful it is to watch people you love struggle as the disease robs them of their mental capacity, and there is nothing you can do about it. It feels a lot like you’re experiencing a gradual death of the person that you knew.”

Alzheimer’s terminates memory and other mental processes which led Gates to contribute his own money toward the Dementia Discovery Fund, a private-public partnership to find a cure.

“It’s a terrible disease that devastates both those who have it and their loved ones,” the philanthropist wrote Monday on his blog. “This is something I know a lot about, because men in my family have suffered from Alzheimer’s. I know how awful it is to watch people you love struggle as the disease robs them of their mental capacity, and there is nothing you can do about it. It feels a lot like you’re experiencing a gradual death of the person that you knew. My family history isn’t the sole reason behind my interest in Alzheimer’s. But my personal experience has exposed me to how hopeless it feels when you or a loved one gets the disease.”


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Aparna Nayak
Aparna Nayak
I have been writing for more than 10 years because of my passion for writing, reading, and sharing it with worldwide audiences. I have published and edited many research papers and white papers in various national and international journals across the internet. I am a writer, technology enthusiast, and social media lover who runs my own blogs and websites.

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